In celebration

BREATHE HOPE INTO YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION

At the Institute for Respiratory Health, we conduct innovative basic and clinical research to prevent and better understand respiratory conditions and improve their diagnosis and management. Our research makes a difference to real people, whether by trialing a new treatment for cystic fibrosis, testing a new drug for pulmonary fibrosis or breaking down the genetic codes that cause inflammation in asthma.

All our research relies on funding to pay for expensive laboratory equipment and consumables. Did you know a box of pipettes costs around $100? And certain chemicals cost $800 for just one bottle, used for one experiment? Our researchers spend much of their time writing grant applications instead of spending time in the lab conducting their important research, and we want to make sure they spend their precious time working on our shared passions.

How can you help?

You can make your special occasion truly meaningful by asking your guests to make a gift to respiratory research in lieu of presents. Especially if you, or a friend or family member is affected by a respiratory condition, you will know how much new drugs or treatments can improve everyday life.

Giving a gift in celebration of a birthday, wedding, anniversary, festive or religious event is a special way to add meaning to an occasion. Your memorable moments can give hope for a better future to those with respiratory disease.

HOW DO I GIVE IN CELEBRATION?

ONLINE

If you are fairly internet savvy, you can set up an online charity gift registry today by creating your own online fundraising page. Or, you can direct your guests to our online donation form.

BY MAIL

Ask your guests to make cheques payable to the Institute for Respiratory Health and send to:
The Institute for Respiratory Health
Ground Floor, E Block
Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital
Nedlands WA 6009

BY TELEPHONE

Phone +61 8 6457 3198 and have your credit card details ready. Contact us if you need any specific help.

In celebration was last modified: August 8th, 2016 by Sarah Cermak