Chronic Diseases and Inflammation

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at a molecular level

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at a molecular level

The cause of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is unknown but it is widely accepted that repeated injury to the epithelium leads to dysregulated healing, initiating a cascade of processes resulting in fibroblast / myofibroblast accumulation and overproduction and deposition of collagen.

Researchers at the Institute for Respiratory Health have pioneered studies identifying the gp130-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 signalling pathway as pivotal in the development of lung fibrosis.

What regulates STAT3-mediate fibrosis is not clear but their current studies are focussing on understanding  the role of mediators known to activate the pathway, cell types that may be regulating the mediator response, as well as a possible breakdown in regulation of the naturally occurring inhibitors that normally control the STAT3 response.

To get involved or for more information, contact the Research Leader.

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at a molecular level was last modified: April 7th, 2017 by Sarah Cermak

Research Leaders

Dr Cecilia Prêle

BSc (Hons), PhD

Head of Tissue Repair Group

cecilia.prele@uwa.edu.au
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Dr Cecilia Prêle was last modified: February 24th, 2017 by Sarah Cermak

A/Prof Steve Mutsaers

BSc (Hons), PhD

Research Associate Professor

steve.mutsaers@resphealth.uwa.edu.au
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A/Prof Steve Mutsaers was last modified: April 7th, 2017 by Sarah Cermak

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis at a molecular level was last modified: April 7th, 2017 by Sarah Cermak